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February 1995

Vol. 137 | No. 1103

The Burlington Magazine

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Editorial

A National Gallery on Clydeside?

In January 1994 we commented with some scepticism on plans announced by the Trustees of the National Gallery of Scotland for a National Gallery of Scottish Art on a new site in Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow. The storm of protest the proposal aroused, above all at the suggestion that the Scottish National Portrait Gallery's collections should leave their pur- pose-built building in Edinburgh, forced the Trustees into a partial retreat later that month, with assurances that the Portrait Gallery would be 'saved'. In May the Secretary of State for Scotland effectively killed off the rump of the project, making it clear that government money would not be available for a gallery of the specific type proposed. Two aspects of his statement were particularly heartening: that he had taken account of the views of the 'art professionals' and the wider public about the desirability of the project; and that he went on to make clear what the priorities for public funding of the National Galleries actually were: first, improved picture storage in Edinburgh; secondly, the restoration and development of the Royal Scottish Academy building as a major international exhibition space; and thirdly, the refurbishment of the areas of the Portrait Gallery's Findlay build- ing soon to be vacated by the National Museums of Scotland so that the National Portrait Gallery can expand sideways and show more of its collections.

 

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  • Robert Adam on Park Avenue: The Interiors for Bolton House

    By Eileen Harris

    It is surprising that Robert Adam's splendid interiors for Bolton House on Russell Square have hitherto escaped attention. Though the house is no longer there, his designs are all preserved in Sir John Soane's Museum and are among the most attractive in the Adam collection. Even more surprising, however, is the discovery of parts of Bolton House in New York City, in the Center for Inter American Relations on the corner of Park Avenue and 68th Street.

     

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  • William Artaud: History Painter and 'Violent Democrat'

    By Kim Sloan

    In 1981 Jennifer Watson published a Shorter Notice in this Magazine identifying the artist and subject of a large painting formerly attributed to George Romney and at various times called Mars and Venus or Thetis pleading with Achilles (Fig. 15). She noted that Timothy Clifford had found an engraving in the British Museum by Bartolozzi (Fig. 16) which identified the artist as the largely forgotten William Artaud (1763- 1823). The engraving also made clear that this enormous painting, stored in the basement of the Yale Center for British Art on account of its size (over 81/2 by 6 feet) and its problematic attribution, was only the left half of a once even larger canvas representing the Triumph of Mercy from William Collins's poem Ode to Mercy of 1746. Watson briefly summarised what was generally known about Artaud, noting that A.C. Sewter had deposited a complete and annotated typescript of further material on Artaud in Manchester University Library, but that she had not had the opportunity to examine it.'

     

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  • Richard Ford as Picture Collector and Patron in Spain

    By Thomas Bean

    On 4th February 1993 a copy of the first (1845) edition of Richard Ford's Hand-Book for Travellers in Spain came up for sale at Swann Galleries, New York, and was acquired by the author of this article.* Bound into it are a series of ten letters from Ford to the art dealer, Dominic Colnaghi (1790-1879), nine of them written from Spain between July 1831 and December 1832, and one from Southernhay, Exeter, in March 1834 (see Appendix I, below).' They give a fascinating account of Ford's purchases of pictures in Spain, detailing those he despatched to Colnaghi for safe keeping before they were sent on to Ford's mother's house at 123 Park Street, Grosvenor Square. Read in conjunction with the provenances given in the catalogue of Ford's pictures sold at Rainy's Rooms on 9th June 1836, as lots 28-54 (see Appendix II, below),2 they throw considerable light on his progress as a collector of Spanish art. They also provide fresh in- formation on Ford as friend and patron of the artist John Frederick Lewis.

     

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  • Isambard Kingdom Brunel's 'Shakespeare Room'

    By Hilarie Faberman,Philip McEvansoneya

    While the engineering achievements of Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-59) are famous, it is less well known that he was also a patron of the arts. In the late 1840s he commissioned a set of paintings of Shakespearean subjects from some of the most distinguished English artists of his day, including Charles West Cope, Augustus Leopold Egg, Edwin Landseer, Frederick Richard Lee, Charles Robert Leslie, and Clarkson Stanfield (see the Appendix below). These were intended for display in the dining room of his house in Duke St, St James's,' which would appear to have become known as the 'Shakespeare Room'2 by the time of his death, if not earlier. This room was the practical expression of enthusiasm for the modern British school of painting, and provides an example of the type of support for the arts that developed among the wealthy professional middle classes during Brunel's lifetime.3

     

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  • Richard Krautheimer (1897-1994)

    By Willibald Sauerländer
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  • Houses and Society in Pompeii and Herculaneum

    By Roger Ling
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  • The Art and Architecture of Islam 1250-1800

    By Anna Contadini
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  • German Sculpture of the Later Renaissance c.1520-1580. Art in an Age of Uncertainty

    By Norbert Jopek
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  • Prints and Engraved Illustrations by and after Henry Fuseli: A Catalogue Raisonne

    By Martin Butlin
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  • Blake and the Idea of the Book

    By Martin Butlin
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  • The English Garden: Meditation and Memorial

    By Kimerly Rorschach
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  • The Lady Lever Art Gallery. Catalogue of Commodes

    By Sarah Medlam
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  • Victorian and Edwardian Paintings in The Lady Lever Art Gallery

    By Malcolm Warner
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  • Art Apart: Art Institutions and Ideology across England and North America (1994)

    By Giles Waterfield
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  • Whistler. London and Paris

    By Wendy Baron
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  • Frank Dobson. London and Leeds

    By Andrew Causey
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  • Maurice Denis. Cologne and Lyon

    By Belinda Thomson
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  • Roma 1630. Rome

    By Elizabeth Cropper
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  • Cy Twombly. New York and Houston

    By Lynne Cooke
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  • Schinkel. Pittsburgh and Chicago

    By Barry Bergdoll
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  • The Legacy of Marcel Duchamp. Minneapolis

    By Francis M. Naumann
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